The pandemic disproved urban progressives' theory about gentrification

From California to the Northeast, a funny thing has happened recently in America’s most expensive metropolitan areas: Rents have gone down. Ever since remote workers began fleeing urban cores at the start of the coronavirus pandemic—whether to the Hamptons or their parents’ basements—urban housing markets have been flooded with empty apartments. As a result, the prices that rental units command in certain large cities have dropped dramatically.

The Atlantic • January 7, 2021

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Amazon pledges $2 billion for affordable housing in three hub cities

Amazon is launching a $2 billion housing equity fund to preserve and create over 20,000 affordable housing units in Washington state’s Puget Sound region; Arlington, Virginia; and Nashville—three areas where the company has or expects to have at least 5,000 employees each in the coming years.

The housing effort reflects the online retailing giant’s commitment to affordable housing and seeks to ensure that moderate- to low-income families can afford housing in resource-rich communities with easy access to neighborhood services, amenities and jobs.

Forbes • January 6, 2021

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How the pandemic led to a rare success in California's effort to house the homeless

State program, Project Homekey, has quietly and efficiently purchased and rehabilitated buildings for homeless individuals.

Los Angeles Times • January 1, 2021

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The radical architecture of tomorrow already exists

From 1950s utopias with towering skyscrapers and flying cars, to 1980s dystopian mega cities like the one in Ridley Scott’s Blade Runner, to recent futurists’ designs of sprawling “green” metropolises, the one thing that everyone can agree on, it seems, is that the future is going to be full of heroic, monumental structures.

Bloomberg • January 4, 2021

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New York halted evictions. But what happens when the ban ends?

When New York State lawmakers approved emergency legislation this week to ban evictions for at least two months, they were seeking to prevent hundreds of thousands of people from being forced from their homes during the winter, with the pandemic still raging. But they also feared something more perilous: a broad ripping at the fabric of society.

The New York Times • January 1, 2021

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